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63: Covid and ECMO – Who do we cannulate? with Jenelle Badulak

“Normal life is changing.  It is now a covid 19 life” – Bin Cao

I write this with some trepidation as well as pride in the role we get to play as we begin the surge of Covid 19 in the United States.  Today we will address the use of ECMO in Covid with an expert in ECMO who is in the throws of the worst outbreak of the United States – Seattle, Washington.  Jenelle Badulak and I give you a short yet powerful discussion about who we should put on ECMO with Covid.

Hosts – Zack Shinar, Jenelle Badulak

ECMO guidance for Coronavirus

MERS ECMO Data
Alshahrani MS, Sindi A, Alshamsi F, Al-Omari A, El Tahan M, Alahmadi B, Zein A, Khatani N, Al-Hameed F, Alamri S, Abdelzaher M, Alghamdi A, Alfousan F, Tash A, Tashkandi W, Alraddadi R, Lewis K, Badawee M, Arabi YM, Fan E, Alhazzani W. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Ann Intensive Care. 2018 Jan 10;8(1):3. doi: 10.1186/s13613-017-0350-x. PubMed PMID: 29330690; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5768582
Chinese Society of Extracorporeal Life Support. [Recommendations on extracorporeal life support for critically ill patients with novel coronavirus pneumonia]. Zhonghua Jie He He Hu Xi Za Zhi. 2020 Feb 9;43(0):E009. doi: 10.3760/cma.j.issn.1001-0939.2020.0009. [Epub ahead of print] Chinese. PubMed PMID: 32035430.
http://rs.yiigle.com/yufabiao/1180132.htm
Inclusion criteria under this paper are–>
Under optimal ventilation conditions (FiO 2 ≥ 0.8, tidal volume 6 ml / kg, PEEP ≥ 10 cmH 2 O), ECMO can be started if there are no contraindications and one of the following conditions is met [ 7 , 8 , 14 , 16 , 17 , 18 ] : (1) PaO 2 / FiO 2 <50 mmHg for more than 3 h; (2) PaO 2 / FiO 2 <80 mmHg for more than 6 h; (3) FiO 2 = 1.0, PaO 2 / FiO 2 <100 mmHg; (4) Arterial blood pH <7.25 and PaCO 2 > 60 mmHg for more than 6 hours, and respiratory rate> 35 times / min; (5) When respiratory rate> 35 times / min, blood pH <7.2 The plateau pressure was> 30 cmH 2 O; (6) severe air leak syndrome; (7) combined with cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest.

Good overall webinar – ECMO considerations start

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62: Jason Bartos Take 2: The Future of ECPR Now

Last month you heard Jason talk about the ECPR program at the University of Minnesota.  This month Zack and Jason talk about post initiation care and the crazy ECPR realities that Demetri, Jason and U of M have created.  The sky is the limit for their team!

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61: Jason Bartos – ECPR Redefined

Jason Bartos and his crew at the University

of Minnesota have revolutionized the concept of ECPR for out of hospital cardiac arrests.  His crew are interventional cardiologists who take OHCA straight to the cardiac cath lab.  They have initiate times of around 6-8 minutes and have neurologically intact survival rates higher than 30%.  Below are two of Jason’s recent papers which every person who considers themselves an ECPR fan should pour over with a fine-toothed comb.  There is so much in these papers.  We split this interview into two pieces because there is so many pearls in it.

Outcomes

Resuscitation paper – 48% survival in 100 patients

Circulation paper 2020– 33% vs. 23% ALPS

Cohort who had VF/VT and one shock vs. a cohort who had VF/VT and failed to ROSC at the scene, in the ambulance, and then all the way to the hospital.
OHCA – > Straight to the Cath lab –> Get on ECMO –> Go to CCU under Cards care.
Inclusion criteria – Vf/vt, lactate <18, paO2 >50,ETCO2>10

References:

Bartos JA, Grunau B, Carlson C, Duval S, Ripeckyj A, Kalra R, Raveendran G,
John R, Conterato M, Frascone RJ, Trembley A, Aufderheide TP, Yannopoulos D.
Improved Survival with Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Despite
Progressive Metabolic Derangement Associated with Prolonged Resuscitation.
Circulation. 2020 Jan 3. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.119.042173. [Epub ahead of
print] PubMed PMID: 31896278.

Bartos JA, Carlson K, Carlson C, Raveendran G, John R, Aufderheide TP,
Yannopoulos D. Surviving refractory out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation
cardiac arrest: Critical care and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation management.
Resuscitation. 2018 Nov;132:47-55. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2018.08.030. Epub
2018 Aug 29. PubMed PMID: 30171974.

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60: ECPR 2.0 with Scott Weingart

Today’s episode focuses on the differences between ECMO physiology in the patient in cardiogenic shock versus the one in cardiac arrest.

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59: Partial REBOA and US PreHospital ECPR Revisited

This month we discuss two different topics we’ve recently had on the podcast.  Albuquerque had started the first US prehospital ECPR program…. and now they have the first patient as well.  Jon and Darren will share with us the exciting news.  Second, we recently had Matt Martin on the podcast talking about partial REBOA.  We got tons of email about this.  This month Zaf Qasim and Austin Johnson come on to talk about some of the controversial aspects of partial REBOA.  Zaf also gives us a great update on the state of REBOA in the world.

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58: First U.S. Pre-Hospital ECPR Program

The U.S. has seen pre-hospital programs spring up in Paris, UK, and Australia.  It
was thought that due to billing issues this could never happen in America….but it has.  Jon Marinaro and Darren Braude have accomplished this against all odds.  Zack interviews the two of them on how they were able to accomplish this task amidst the many financial, logistic, and medical problems surrounding this monumental task.

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57: The New REBOA catheter – Perfecting the Partial Occlusion

Over the last two years, partial or intermittent REBOA has been
thought to be a significant advantage over complete REBOA.  How to do this and how to use our current imperfect catheters in this arena is still in question.  Matthew Martin and his colleagues at Madigan Medical Center have published the first study using the Prytime’s new catheter for partial REBOA.  Zack interviews Matt in this episode about his latest paper in Journal of Trauma and Acute Surgery.  Dr. Martin is extensively published in the field and offers his insight in the specific flows that maximize survival within the conflicting problems of hemorrhagic shock and lower body ischemia.

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56: Pressors, Fluid, or Flow – Optimizing ECMO Physiology

A post arrest patient just got initiated on ECMO.  Do you give fluids, add pressors, or increase flow?  Marc Dickstein, an anesthesiologist from Columbia University and an expert in the physiology of ECMO, talks with Zack about how to manage these patients, what diagnostics we need and how to optimize your use of the machine.  This talk is a must for everyone starting ECPR in their departments.

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55 – Anticoagulation of the ECMO Patient with Troy Seelhammer

Do you give heparin to your ECMO patients?  Well, let’s rethink this.  This episode is All Things Anticoagulation!  Zack talks with Troy Seelhammer, an intensivist from Mayo Clinic Rochester.  He manages ECMO patients in his daily practice there.  He has become a master of the subject of anticoagulation.  He will talk about heparin, bilvalirudin, or maybe no anticoagulation.  He talks about the when to be aggressive and when to cut back.  Below is a wonderful synopsis of Troy’s thoughts on anticoagulation on pump.

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Our Recent ED ECMO article in Journal of Emergency Medicine

  Check out this link to the full article from our recent Emergency Physician initiated ECMO cohort https://www.jem-journal.com/article/S0736-4679(19)30057-5/fulltext?fbclid=IwAR2yiup48NSVCKXQ9xv8ycJR6Ub2NnFB1Wuu4BagtR498O1dl9GlF0l3xAg

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