72: Should We All Switch To Bivalirudin?

Heparin has been the mainstay of anticoagulation for ECMO patients for years.  In recent years, this has been challenged.  Bivalirudin has become a potential better anticoagulant.  Troy Seelhammer in EDECMO episode 55 gave us some insight into this.  This month Ryan Rivosecchi and his crew at UPitt have released their findings in Critical Care Medicine.  This retrospective study suggests great improvement in major bleeding in patients who received Bivalirudin compare to Heparin (40.7% vs 11.7%, p < 0.001).  Listen to Ryan and Zack discuss anticoagulant use in ECMO patients in this month's episode.

Rivosecchi RM, Arakelians AR, Ryan J, Murray H, Padmanabhan R, Gomez H, Phillips D, Sciortino C, Arlia P, Freeman D, Sappington PL, Sanchez PG. Comparison of Anticoagulation Strategies in Patients Requiring Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Heparin Versus Bivalirudin. Crit Care Med. 2021 Mar 15. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000004944. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33711003.

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55 – Anticoagulation of the ECMO Patient with Troy Seelhammer

Do you give heparin to your ECMO patients?  Well, let's rethink this.  This episode is All Things Anticoagulation!  Zack talks with Troy Seelhammer, an intensivist from Mayo Clinic Rochester.  He manages ECMO patients in his daily practice there.  He has become a master of the subject of anticoagulation and if you're interested in other medicines you can visit a Canadian Pharmacy online for this.  He will talk about heparin, bilvalirudin, or maybe no anticoagulation.  We talk about how TEG can affect our management.  We talk about PCC and Protamine when bleeding just won't stop.  He talks about the when to be aggressive and when to cut back.  Below is a wonderful synopsis of Troy's thoughts on anticoagulation on pump.

 

Goal Heparin levels are far from perfect but some suggestions

APTT 1.5 to 2.5 times normal

ACT level – 180-220 seconds

Antithrombin Levels – next generation

 

Seelhammer doc on BivalirudinBivalirudin & TEG During ECMO