62: Jason Bartos Take 2: The Future of ECPR Now

Last month you heard Jason talk about the ECPR program at the University of Minnesota.  This month Zack and Jason talk about post initiation care and the crazy ECPR realities that Demetris, Jason and U of M have created.  The sky is the limit for their team!

61: Jason Bartos – ECPR Redefined

Jason Bartos and his crew at the University

Image result for university of minnesota cardiology"

of Minnesota have revolutionized the concept of ECPR for out of hospital cardiac arrests.  His crew are interventional cardiologists who take OHCA straight to the cardiac cath lab.  They have initiate times of around 6-8 minutes and have neurologically intact survival rates higher than 30%.  Below are two of Jason’s recent papers which every person who considers themselves an ECPR fan should pour over with a fine-toothed comb.  There is so much in these papers.  We split this interview into two pieces because there is so many pearls in it.

 

Outcomes

Resuscitation paper – 48% survival in 100 patients

Circulation paper 2020– 33% vs. 23% ALPS

  • Cohort who had VF/VT and one shock vs. a cohort who had VF/VT and failed to ROSC at the scene, in the ambulance, and then all the way to the hospital.
  • OHCA – > Straight to the Cath lab –> Get on ECMO –> Go to CCU under Cards care.
  • Inclusion criteria – Vf/vt, lactate <18, paO2 >50,ETCO2>10

 

References:

Bartos JA, Grunau B, Carlson C, Duval S, Ripeckyj A, Kalra R, Raveendran G,
John R, Conterato M, Frascone RJ, Trembley A, Aufderheide TP, Yannopoulos D.
Improved Survival with Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Despite
Progressive Metabolic Derangement Associated with Prolonged Resuscitation.
Circulation. 2020 Jan 3. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.119.042173. [Epub ahead of
print] PubMed PMID: 31896278.

Bartos JA, Carlson K, Carlson C, Raveendran G, John R, Aufderheide TP,
Yannopoulos D. Surviving refractory out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation
cardiac arrest: Critical care and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation management.
Resuscitation. 2018 Nov;132:47-55. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2018.08.030. Epub
2018 Aug 29. PubMed PMID: 30171974.

60: ECPR 2.0 with Scott Weingart

     We've had some recent episodes on ECMO physiology.  Today's episode focuses on the differences between ECMO physiology in the patient in cardiogenic shock versus the one in cardiac arrest. Scott Weingart talks with Zack about how the difference between these two patient populations is HUGE!  Scott also mentions details about cannulation and some critical post ECMO initiation pearls.

 

 

 

 

ECPR 2.0

The Patient
1. OOH Cardiac Arrest Patients are Different

Cannulation
2. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Placement
3. Wire choices
4. Wire Location Verification
5. Small arterial cannulae
6. Simpler Circuits

Post-Pump Critical Care
7. Find the Injuries
8. Mandatory leg perfusion
9. Lower Anticoagulation Goals
10. Lower Flow Goals
11. Try to avoid venting – Truby et al. PMID:28422817, less is more
12. Understanding Cardiac Prognostication / Stunning
13. Understanding Neuro Prognostication
14. Protection/Ownership
15. In it for the Long Haul

 

59: Partial REBOA and US PreHospital ECPR Revisited

This month we discuss two different topics we've recently had on the podcast.  Albuquerque had started the first US prehospital ECPR program…. and now they have the first patient as well.  Jon and Darren will share with us the exciting news.  Second, we recently had Matt Martin on the podcast talking about partial REBOA.  We got tons of email about this.  This month Zaf Qasim and Austin Johnson come on to talk about some of the controversial aspects of partial REBOA.  Zaf also gives us a great update on the state of REBOA in the world.

 

55 – Anticoagulation of the ECMO Patient with Troy Seelhammer

Do you give heparin to your ECMO patients?  Well, let's rethink this.  This episode is All Things Anticoagulation!  Zack talks with Troy Seelhammer, an intensivist from Mayo Clinic Rochester.  He manages ECMO patients in his daily practice there.  He has become a master of the subject of anticoagulation.  He will talk about heparin, bilvalirudin, or maybe no anticoagulation.  We talk about how TEG can affect our management.  We talk about PCC and Protamine when bleeding just won't stop.  He talks about the when to be aggressive and when to cut back.  Below is a wonderful synopsis of Troy's thoughts on anticoagulation on pump.

 

Goal Heparin levels are far from perfect but some suggestions

APTT 1.5 to 2.5 times normal

ACT level – 180-220 seconds

Antithrombin Levels – next generation

 

Seelhammer doc on BivalirudinBivalirudin & TEG During ECMO

 

54: Confirmation of Wire Placement with Sacha Richardson

In this episode, Sacha Richardson talks with Zack about a problem common to all ECPR programs- how do we confirm the placement of the wires?  During chest compressions and even in patients with a pulse, confirmation of which vessel you have cannulated can be difficult.  Sacha shares some tricks and trips on how to get real time confirmation of the wires.  Sacha also gives us a preview of some of the exciting endeavors that he has undertaken in Melbourne with pre-hospital ECMO.

53b: Resuscitationist Inserted Distal Perfusion Catheter with Chris Couch

 

In this episode, we again explore the world of the distal perfusion catheter.  You heard from Joe Dubose the vascular surgeons point of view; now let's see how non-surgeon resuscitationists are dealing with this problem.  You will hear from Chris Couch, a critical care trained emergency physician from Dallas Texas and his colleague Omar Hernandez who have some novel thoughts and experiences related to when and how we insert these catheters.  You will hear about checking compartment pressures, poor man's way to “fluoro” your catheter, and much more.

 

Great summary of supporting literature – DPC Lit Search

 

53: Distal Perfusion Catheter with Joe Dubose

Episode 53 is all about the distal perfusion catheter12.  We are inserting a 15-19 Fr catheter into the femoral artery.  This limits the flow of blood to the affected extremity.  Many institutions have gone to mandatory distal perfusion catheters.  This episode is all about those catheters – when, how, which, and where.  Joe Dubose, the world reknown vascular and trauma surgeon, joins us to discuss the details of this important piece of post pump initiation.

Take Homes –

  • Common Femoral -> Superficial Femoral Artery or Posterior Tibial/Dorsalis Pedis
  • Check distal perfusion frequently
  • 5-7 Fr Catheters
  • Doppler/Temperature/Color of distal extremity
  • Remember side port of arterial ECMO catheter significantly limits the flow dynamics through the catheter

1.
Kaufeld T, Beckmann E, Ius F, et al. Risk factors for critical limb ischemia in patients undergoing femoral cannulation for venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: Is distal limb perfusion a mandatory approach? Perfusion. February 2019:267659119827231. [PubMed]
2.
Lamb K, DiMuzio P, Johnson A, et al. Arterial protocol including prophylactic distal perfusion catheter decreases limb ischemia complications in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. J Vasc Surg. 2017;65(4):1074-1079. [PubMed]

50b Inter-Facility Transport of ECMO patients Part 2 of 2

This is part 2 of Transport of ECMO patients.  Mikael Broman is one of the world's leaders on ECMO transport.  He works at the Karolinska institute in Sweden and ha

s and continues to publish in the arena of ECMO transport.  As you will see, he offers a world of experience and certainly some critical information that we would all benefit from listening to.  I'm a smarter ECMO-tologist as a result of Micke!1234

 

 

 

 

ELSO transport guidelines -https://www. elso.org/Portals/0/Files/ELSO%20GUIDELINES%20 FOR%20ECMO%20TRANSPORT_May2015.pdf

 

1.
Bryner B, Cooley E, Copenhaver W, et al. Two Decades’ Experience With Interfacility Transport on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation. T. 2014;98(4):1363-1370. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2014.06.025
2.
Javidfar J, Brodie D, Takayama H, et al. Safe Transport of Critically Ill Adult Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support to a Regional Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Center. A. 2011;57(5):421-425. doi:10.1097/mat.0b013e3182238b55
3.
Broman LM. Inter-hospital transports on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in different health-care systems. J. 2017;9(9):3425-3429. doi:10.21037/jtd.2017.07.93
4.
Ericsson A, Frenckner B, Broman L. Adverse Events during Inter-Hospital Transports on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2017;21(4):448-455. [PubMed]

50a Inter-facility Transport of ECMO patients Part 1 of 2

This month we are looking at how to transport patients from one facility to another on ECMO.  This is a difficult task, full of potential catastrophes.  Zack interviews Leon Eydelman, an ER/Critical Care physician from Chicago, and Michael Broman out of Karolinska in Sweden.  Leon will be bringing us up to speed on what to do, potential fails, and how to start the process of setting up a transport process for ECMO patients.  Dr. Eydelman will be teaching a new section at Reanimate this January specifically geared toward the transport of patients.  So if you are a nurse, medic, perfusionist, or RT involved in the transport of ECMO patients you will not want to miss Leon's section  Sign up at Reanimateconference.com.  Part 2 of this podcast includes the interview with Dr. Broman which will blow your mind.  So much great stuff in both of these interviews.