62: Jason Bartos Take 2: The Future of ECPR Now

Last month you heard Jason talk about the ECPR program at the University of Minnesota.  This month Zack and Jason talk about post initiation care and the crazy ECPR realities that Demetris, Jason and U of M have created.  The sky is the limit for their team!

61: Jason Bartos – ECPR Redefined

Jason Bartos and his crew at the University

Image result for university of minnesota cardiology"

of Minnesota have revolutionized the concept of ECPR for out of hospital cardiac arrests.  His crew are interventional cardiologists who take OHCA straight to the cardiac cath lab.  They have initiate times of around 6-8 minutes and have neurologically intact survival rates higher than 30%.  Below are two of Jason’s recent papers which every person who considers themselves an ECPR fan should pour over with a fine-toothed comb.  There is so much in these papers.  We split this interview into two pieces because there is so many pearls in it.

 

Outcomes

Resuscitation paper – 48% survival in 100 patients

Circulation paper 2020– 33% vs. 23% ALPS

  • Cohort who had VF/VT and one shock vs. a cohort who had VF/VT and failed to ROSC at the scene, in the ambulance, and then all the way to the hospital.
  • OHCA – > Straight to the Cath lab –> Get on ECMO –> Go to CCU under Cards care.
  • Inclusion criteria – Vf/vt, lactate <18, paO2 >50,ETCO2>10

 

References:

Bartos JA, Grunau B, Carlson C, Duval S, Ripeckyj A, Kalra R, Raveendran G,
John R, Conterato M, Frascone RJ, Trembley A, Aufderheide TP, Yannopoulos D.
Improved Survival with Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Despite
Progressive Metabolic Derangement Associated with Prolonged Resuscitation.
Circulation. 2020 Jan 3. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.119.042173. [Epub ahead of
print] PubMed PMID: 31896278.

Bartos JA, Carlson K, Carlson C, Raveendran G, John R, Aufderheide TP,
Yannopoulos D. Surviving refractory out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation
cardiac arrest: Critical care and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation management.
Resuscitation. 2018 Nov;132:47-55. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2018.08.030. Epub
2018 Aug 29. PubMed PMID: 30171974.

60: ECPR 2.0 with Scott Weingart

     We've had some recent episodes on ECMO physiology.  Today's episode focuses on the differences between ECMO physiology in the patient in cardiogenic shock versus the one in cardiac arrest. Scott Weingart talks with Zack about how the difference between these two patient populations is HUGE!  Scott also mentions details about cannulation and some critical post ECMO initiation pearls.

 

 

 

 

ECPR 2.0

The Patient
1. OOH Cardiac Arrest Patients are Different

Cannulation
2. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Placement
3. Wire choices
4. Wire Location Verification
5. Small arterial cannulae
6. Simpler Circuits

Post-Pump Critical Care
7. Find the Injuries
8. Mandatory leg perfusion
9. Lower Anticoagulation Goals
10. Lower Flow Goals
11. Try to avoid venting – Truby et al. PMID:28422817, less is more
12. Understanding Cardiac Prognostication / Stunning
13. Understanding Neuro Prognostication
14. Protection/Ownership
15. In it for the Long Haul

 

58: First U.S. Pre-Hospital ECPR Program

The U.S. has seen pre-hospital programs spring up in Paris, UK, and Australia.  It was thought that due to billing issues this could never happen in America….but it has.  Jon Marinaro and Darren Braude have accomplished this against all odds.  Zack interviews the two of them on how they were able to accomplish this task amidst the many financial, logistic, and medical problems surrounding this monumental task.

 

 

 

 

The Albuquerque Bean Dip!!  Love this organization from cleanse to cannulation

 

Update:

News story

56: Pressors, Fluid, or Flow – Optimizing ECMO Physiology

A post arrest patient just got initiated on ECMO.  Do you give fluids, add pressors, or increase flow?  Marc Dickstein, an anesthesiologist from Columbia University and an expert in the physiology of ECMO, talks with Zack about how to manage these patients, what diagnostics we need and how to optimize your use of the machine.  This talk is a must for everyone starting ECPR in their departments.

Photo: Marc Dickstein

Marc's ECMO physiology website Harvi

Marc's ASAIO article on ECMO physiology –

Dickstein ML. The Starling Relationship and Veno-Arterial ECMO: Ventricular Distension Explained. ASAIO J. 2018 Jul/Aug;64(4):497-501. doi: 10.1097/MAT.0000000000000660. PubMed PMID: 29076945.

Zack's recent Resus Editorial on Impella

Shinar Z. Is the "Unprotected Heart" a clinical myth? Use of IABP, Impella,
and ECMO in the acute cardiac patient. Resuscitation. 2019 May 21. pii:
S0300-9572(19)30173-X. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2019.05.005. [Epub ahead of
print] PubMed PMID: 31125528

54: Confirmation of Wire Placement with Sacha Richardson

In this episode, Sacha Richardson talks with Zack about a problem common to all ECPR programs- how do we confirm the placement of the wires?  During chest compressions and even in patients with a pulse, confirmation of which vessel you have cannulated can be difficult.  Sacha shares some tricks and trips on how to get real time confirmation of the wires.  Sacha also gives us a preview of some of the exciting endeavors that he has undertaken in Melbourne with pre-hospital ECMO.

52: Brain Freeze- Selective Retrograde Cerebral Perfusion for Intra-Arrest Neuroprotection

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We've all heard of therapeutic hypothermia.  Some of us have heard of deep hypothermia for traumatic arrest.  But what about deep regional hypothermia of brain for cardiac arrest!  Zack interviewed Rob Schultz, a CT surgeon resident from Calgary who is doing research on deep hypothermia of the brain using some of the tactics that are utilized in operating room.  His stuff is mind blowing!

1.
Milewski RK, Pacini D, Moser GW, et al. Retrograde and Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion: Results in Short Elective Arch Reconstructive Times. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2010;89(5):1448-1457. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2010.01.056
2.
Keeling WB, Leshnower BG, Hunting JC, Binongo J, Chen EP. Hypothermia and Selective Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion Is Safe for Arch Repair in Type A Dissection. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2017;104(3):767-772. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2017.02.066
3.
Papadopoulos N, Risteski P, Hack T, et al. Is More than One Hour of Selective Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion in Moderate-to-Mild Systemic Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest for Surgery of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Safe? Thorac cardiovasc Surg. 2017;66(03):215-221. doi:10.1055/s-0037-1604451
4.
Perreas K, Samanidis G, Thanopoulos A, et al. Antegrade or Retrograde Cerebral Perfusion in Ascending Aorta and Hemiarch Surgery? A Propensity-Matched Analysis. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2016;101(1):146-152. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2015.06.029
5.
McCullough J, Zhang N, Reich D, et al. Cerebral metabolic suppression during hypothermic circulatory arrest in humans. Ann Thorac Surg. 1999;67(6):1895-1899; discussion 1919-21. [PubMed]
6.
Yan T, Bannon P, Bavaria J, et al. Consensus on hypothermia in aortic arch surgery. Ann Cardiothorac Surg. 2013;2(2):163-168. [PubMed]

NEW PAPER: Extracorporeal Life Support in the Emergency Department: A Narrative Review for the Emergency Physician

Pulmonary Critical Care guru Justyna Swol from Nuremberg, Germany invited Scott, Zack and me to co-author this paper along with several other ECLS experts.   Just published in the Journal Resuscitation, this is a great overview of Emergent ECLS(AKA ECPR) from the point of view of the Emergency and Critical Care specialist.1

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2018.10.014

 

1.
Swol J, Belohlávek J, Brodie D, et al. Extracorporeal life support in the emergency department: A narrative review for the emergency physician. Resuscitation. 2018;133:108-117. [PubMed]

49 – You Can’t Spell REBOA without the ER – Endovascular Resuscitation of the Trauma Patient – Zaf Qasim

In this episode, Zack Shinar interviews Zaf Qasim about the recent controversies with ACEP and ACS about who can do REBOA.  Zaf is one of the world's experts on REBOA and he's an ER doc!  Zaf works at the University of Pennsylvania, trained in London

as well as Shock Trauma in Baltimore and teaches at Reanimate.  When you come to the essence of this episode, the question is what is the emergency physician's role in the trauma resuscitation?  Both Zaf and Zack agree; we need to be the resuscitationist in the trauma suite.  We need to manage the airway and then quickly take over the arterial and venous access, interpret the transduced pressures, manage the massive transfusion protocol and be ready to insert the REBOA catheter while the trauma surgeon is involved with the left chest, the source of bleeding and where the next destination for this patient will be.

EDECMO 48: When Should I Transport a Cardiac Arrest?

This part two of August 2018.  We are now tackling the difficult question of when to transport cardiac arrests if I have ECMO available?  Brian Grunau is an expert in this question.  Brian has become a giant in the world of ECMO.  His research, leadership and experience have pushed the Canadian ECPR contingency to the forefront.   Brian gives us some insight on what factors I should consider and when should I transport.1

1.
Grunau B, Reynolds J, Scheuermeyer F, et al. Relationship between Time-to-ROSC and Survival in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest ECPR Candidates: When is the Best Time to Consider Transport to Hospital? P. 2016;20(5):615-622. doi:10.3109/10903127.2016.1149652