EDECMO 38 – ECMO and Trauma – with Pal Ager-Wick and Magnus Larsson

ECMO in trauma

This episode is all about ECMO in trauma – not the usual ARDS, TRALI VV-ECMO – we’re talking about VA ECMO for the acutely dying trauma patient. Zack interviews Pål Ager-Wick from Tromso Norway, and Magnus Larsson from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. We talk about everything from how ECMO helps the hemorrhaging trauma patient to the futuristic “Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation” concept being done in Baltimore now.

Photo used with permission of SAMU of Paris


Bullet Points:

  • VV ECMO –
    • Marginal data suggests ECMO beneficial in ARDS (CESAR, ANZECMO trials)
    • ARDS and TRALI in trauma is a reasonable extension of this
  • Damage Control Surgery –
    • focus on coagulation
    • stop major bleeders and then take to ICU
    • lethal triad of coagulation includes hypothermia, dilution of coagulation factors and acidosis
  • Coagulation of trauma: ECMO can improve all three components of lethal triad
  • Heparin has been successfully withheld in bleeding trauma patients
  • ECMO in Severe Chest Trauma – 10 patients, 8 ruptured cardiac chambers1
  • Blunt cardiac arrest – a case report2
  • Bleeding less than 15% mortality after 1995, Intracranial hemorrhage patients can survive. In fact none of the ICH patients on ECMO who died died of brain bleeding (60-93% survived). Survival was 42-63% for VA ECMO. Lower ACT (<180 sec)3
  • ELSO – VA ECMO in trauma – 45% survival4
  • ECMO reduces venous pressure which may be beneficial in hemorrhaging patients5
  • Tisherman – Suspended Animation: Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation678

Magnus Larsson

References

1.
Huh U, Song S, Chung S, et al. Is Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Practical in Severe Chest Trauma? : A Systematic Review in Single Center of Developing Country. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. August 2017. [PubMed]
2.
Kudo S, Tanaka K, Okada K, Takemura T. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for blunt cardiac rupture: A case report. Am J Emerg Med. August 2017. [PubMed]
3.
Bedeir K, Seethala R, Kelly E. Extracorporeal life support in trauma: Worth the risks? A systematic review of published series. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2017;82(2):400-406. [PubMed]
4.
ELSO Registry. Extracoporeal Life Support Organization. http://www.elso.org/Registry/Statistics/InternationalSummary.aspx.
5.
Larsson M, Talving P, Palmér K, Frenckner B, Riddez L, Broomé M. Experimental extracorporeal membrane oxygenation reduces central venous pressure: an adjunct to control of venous hemorrhage? Perfusion. 2010;25(4):217-223. [PubMed]
6.
Tisherman S, Safar P, Radovsky A, Peitzman A, Sterz F, Kuboyama K. Therapeutic deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in dogs: a resuscitation modality for hemorrhagic shock with “irreparable” injury. J Trauma. 1990;30(7):836-847. [PubMed]
7.
Tisherman S. Salvage techniques in traumatic cardiac arrest: thoracotomy, extracorporeal life support, and therapeutic hypothermia. Curr Opin Crit Care. 2013;19(6):594-598. [PubMed]
8.
Kutcher M, Forsythe R, Tisherman S. Emergency preservation and resuscitation for cardiac arrest from trauma. Int J Surg. 2016;33(Pt B):209-212. [PubMed]

EDECMO 35 – REBOA REVISITED!

REBOA (Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta) is used to gain proximal control over non-compressible hemorrhage below the diaphragm.  The concept has been covered extensively in social media.

Weingart did a wonderful job describing REBOA using the 12F Chek-Flo and CODA catheter here:

EMCrit Podcast 121 – REBOA

Our good friend Rob Orman from ERCAST.org and EMRAP interviewed Zaf Qasim:

REBOA 101

And Weingart revisited REBOA, spoke with Joe DuBose, and described the newest REBOA catheter, the PryTime 7F ER REBOA catheter that most of us now use:

Podcast 170 – the ER REBOA Catheter with Joe DuBose

 

…So we aren't going to rehash any of that stuff in this episode!

In this episode, Zack takes a deep dive into REBOA implementation, physiology, and complications with four of the biggest movers in the world of REBOA:

Dr. David Callaway Military Trauma Specialist

Dr. David Callaway is an Emergency Physician from the Carolinas Health System, who also serves on the Defense Health Board Subcommittee on Trauma and Injury as well as the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care- two of the key U.S. advisory bodies for battlefield trauma care. He is the Co- Chairman of the Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care, a best practices R&D group charged with translating battlefield lessons learned to civilian high threat prehospital medicine.

Dr. Callaway describes how they implement REBOA  in their busy trauma unit and some of the data behind its use.


 

Dr. Tatuya Norii University of New Mexico

But REBOA is not without controversy.  So Zack turned to Dr. Tatsuyo Norii, from the University of New Mexico, who published a study that showed that REBOA may result in increased mortality in certain patients.1 Dr. Norii believes that we should avoid REBOA in patients with traumatic brain injury and patients with multi-system trauma.

Shinar and Dr. Norii also discussed how REBOA may also be considered  non-trauma situations where patients are bleeding to death:  ruptured ectopic pregnancy, postpartum hemorrhage, ruptured abdominal aneurysm, and perhaps some patients with hemorrhagic gastrointestinal bleeding.

 


Austin Johnson MD PhD UC Davis

Then,  Zack turned to Dr. Austin Johnson from UC Davis.  They do  a deep dive into the physiology of of a patient on REBOA and its nuances in traumatic brain injury.

And lastly, They discussed the concept of partial REBOA (P-REBOA) and the concept of “windsocking”. As the balloon size is decreased by decreasing the volumes within it, the flow around the balloon is not linear. This becomes increasingly important as we consider ‘partial REBOA', prolonged occlusion, and balloon takedown, a topic published by Dr. Johnson a few months ago.2

 


Zaf Qasim MD REBOA guru

Finally, we wrap things up with a discussion with Zaf Qasim, REBOA guru who teaches the REBOA modules at our endovascular resuscitation conference, REANIMATE.

Do you want to learn how to aggressively manage the crashing trauma and medical patients using ECMO, ECPR, REBOA, ultrasound  and advanced resuscitation techniques?

 

REANIMATE 4 is September 21-22, 2017:

Register for REANIMATE 4

References

1.
Norii T, Crandall C, Terasaka Y. Survival of severe blunt trauma patients treated with resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta compared with propensity score-adjusted untreated patients. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2015;78(4):721-728. [PubMed]
2.
Johnson M, Neff L, Williams T, DuBose J, EVAC S. Partial resuscitative balloon occlusion of the aorta (P-REBOA): Clinical technique and rationale. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2016;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S133-S137. [PubMed]

NEW ARTICLE: Emergency department initiation of percutaneous cardiopulmonary support for traumatic cardiac tamponade with coagulated pericardial effusion

2014 case report just published out of Japan. Interesting. Our 2012 ECPR study was cited here.

Why not simultaneously try the pericardiocentesis during the cannulation procedure?

 

But this is good proof of concept for another rare application of ECLS in a trauma scenario.

This article is open access, thanks to Elsevier, so here it is:

2014 coagulated cardiac tamponade with ECPR